Edited Volumes

A Cultural History of Sport in Antiquity (2021)

co-edited with Charles Stocking

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This volume, which focuses on the period between 800 BCE and 600 CE, is the first of six volumes in Bloomsbury's A Cultural History of Sport. All of the volumes in that series explore the internal practices of sport and the ways and degrees to which sport has reflected—and been integrated into—contemporary cultural criteria. All six volumes are constructed on the same pattern, with an initial chapter outlining the purposes of sport during the time frame to which the volume is devoted. Seven chapters, each written by a specialist of the period, then deal in turn with time and space, equipment and technology, rules and order, conflict and accommodation, inclusion and segregation, athletes and identities, and representation. The reader therefore has the choice between synchronic and diachronic approaches, between concentrating on the diverse facets of sport in a single historical period, and exploring one or more of those facets as they evolved over time and became concretized in the practices and relations of the twenty-first century.

How to Do Things with History (2018)

co-edited with Danielle Allen and Paul Millett

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How to Do Things with History is a collection of essays that explores current and future approaches to the study of ancient Greek cultural history. Rather than focus directly on methodology, the essays in this volume demonstrate how some of the most productive and significant methodologies for studying ancient Greece can be employed to illuminate a range of different kinds of subject matter. These essays, which bring together the work of some of the most talented scholars in the field, are based upon papers delivered at a conference held at Cambridge University in September of 2014 in honor of Paul Cartledge's retirement from the post of A. G. Leventis Professor of Ancient Greek Culture.

For the better part of four decades, Paul Cartledge has spearheaded intellectual developments in the field of Greek culture in both scholarly and public contexts. His work has combined insightful historical accounts of particular places, periods, and thinkers with a willingness to explore comparative approaches and a keen focus on methodology. Cartledge has throughout his career emphasized the analysis of practice - the study not, for instance, of the history of thought but of thinking in action and through action.

The assembled essays trace the broad horizons charted by Cartledge's work: from studies of political thinking to accounts of legal and cultural practices to politically astute approaches to historiography. The contributors to this volume all take the parameters and contours of Cartledge's work, which has profoundly influenced an entire generation of scholars, as starting points for their own historical and historiographical explorations. Those parameters and contours provide a common thread that runs through and connects all of the essays while also offering sufficient freedom for individual contributors to demonstrate an array of rich and varied approaches to the study of the past.

A Companion to Sport and Spectacle in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2014)

co-edited with Donald Kyle

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A Companion to Sport and Spectacle in Greek and Roman Antiquity presents a series of original essays that apply a socio-historical perspective to myriad aspects of ancient sport. Featuring contributions from a wide range of international scholars in various Classical antiquity disciplines, readings focus on the status and roles of participants, organizers, and spectators while addressing such themes as class, gender, ethnicity, religion, violence, and more. Introductory essays on the historiography of Greek and Roman sport are followed by specialized readings relating to Greek sports in specific locales such as Athens and Sparta. Subsequent readings relating to the Roman Empire focus on sport and spectacle in the city of Rome and in various Roman cities and provinces. Distinctions between “sport” and “spectacle” are examined and understanding sport and spectacle as part of a broader social canvas, rather than isolated activities, is emphasized. Offering a wealth of insights to our current understanding of the role of sport and spectacle in the ancient world, A Companion to Sport and Spectacle in Greek and Roman Antiquity represents an invaluable scholarly contribution to ancient sport studies.